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“COAL-CUTTING MACHINERY”
The Mining Journal, 1st February 1879

 

An improved and economic coalcutter is at present being introduced by Mr. J.G. Cranston, of Newcastle-on-Tyne, whose name is already favourably known in connection with rock drills and air compressors, and promises greatly to economise labour and increase the output with a much greater percentage of round coal.

At the trial at the Trimdon Grange Colliery, in the presence of a number of colliery viewers and mining engineers, the new machine, which is mounted on four wheels to suit the gauge of rail for tubs, and weighs only 4 cwts. (complete) gave great satisfaction. The machine cut a 2 inch groove 3 yards along the bottom of the face of coal 3ft. 4inches in, with one man feeding it along the face, including all stoppage, in 55 mins. It has one 4 inch diameter steam or air cylinder and 5 inch stroke, the piston having both a reciprocating and revolving motion at the same time. The extreme dimensions are 3ft. x 2ft. 6ins. x 10ins. high, so that it takes up exceedingly little room in the confined spaces or low seams of coal. It can cut itself into the coal the desired length, and will undercut the same groove level with the sole or plate below the coal, so that there is not any coal cut to waste other than the 2inch groove, the diameter of the cutting tool. The machine does not require any fixing when it is at work, and clears itself of the coal dust as it works along. It will with one man and a lad cut 30 yards along 1 yard in a shift of eight hours. It is highly thought of by many practical men, who are capable of knowing its utility, and an early opportunity will be taken to publish an illustrated description of it in the Mining Journal.

Page 109 Col. 2

 


Submitted by Alan Vickers

Question
Did they ever publish an illustrated description in the Mining Journal ?
If yes, does anyone know the date or issue in which it appeared?

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